FAQ
USA: +1 (844) 634 8377
MEX: +52 (998) 877 1117
M: +52 1 (998) 734 4446
Av Francisco I Madero #10
Isla Mujeres Q. Roo Mexico
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General Booking Questions

Reservations for diving and instruction should be made at least three (3) days in advance. This helps us give you the best service possible by making sure that all necessary staff and equipment are available. You can make your reservations directly on our reservation page. Walk-ins are welcome and will be accommodated whenever possible.

A deposit of 20% of the total is required to reserve your initial ocean dive or PADI instruction. Deposits can be made by credit card or through PayPal accounts.

If you are diving more than one day, please open an account with us. This allows us to bundle your dives to give you the best package price. Shop prices are in US dollars. Payment can be made using Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Paypal, USD or MX pesos. Our Dollar Exchange rate is the same as the transaction day. Payments made by Paypal, Credit or Debit card are subject to 16% Goverment TAX fee. The more you dive the lower your per dive price will be. No additional discounts will be offered.

Cancellations made at least 24 hours in advance will be given a 50% refund of the deposit. Failure to cancel your activities within the allocated time frame or no-shows will result in a retainment of the full deposit. Providing there is sufficient notice, this deposit can be used on a different date or activity. If you need to reschedule, but not cancel your dive, we will do everything we can to accommodate you without extra charges.


Diving Related Questions

Yes, if you follow PADI international standards, dive with one of our certified instructors or divemasters and follow the instructions given, anyone can dive.

You need to be at least 10 years old to become a PADI Junior Scuba Diver, and you need to be 15 to get certified as an Open Water Diver.

No, there is a quick program called "Discover Scuba Diving", which is a half day activity that gives you the opportunity to try scuba diving and then decide if you want to get certified.

You don't need to be an excellent swimmer, but it is preferable that you feel comfortable in the water and that you at least can keep yourself floating.

Depending on the certification level you want to get. Open Water 3-4 days, Advance Open Water 2-3 days, Rescue Diver 3-4 days

Our average diving trip time is around 4 hours, and it depends mostly on the dive sites we are doing that day, some of them are further away than others.

It depends in your own air consumption, for a beginner diver is usually between 35-45 minutes, but an experienced diver can make a tank last up to an hour and a half depending in depth.

Yes, we offer several activities and if you have a mixed group of divers and snorkelers, the best option could be a private trip.

Yes, we need to confirm your trip at least 24 hours before the date in order to have gear and tanks ready for you and so you can have a secured spot on our boat. However, we can usually accommodate walk-ins.

We do provide the cancun pick up service for an additional fee, and also depending of the flexibility of the place you want to be picked up. Most marinas are ok with particular boats picking people up, but some of them have restricted access.

Not necesairly, We have all the required high qualiy gear for diving and snorkeling for rent at the shop for a small fee and our snorkel trips have gear included.

Depending in the size of the group we have on that day, we usually can take other people if we have available space b marine but need to cover the small marine park fees.

There is a large amount of underwater attractions around the island, from the Underwater Museum, shallow reefs with thousands of fish, Parrot Fish, Angel Fish, Sea Turtles, Sting Rays, and Eels. Shipwrecks surrounded by Spotted Eagle Rays. Drift dives where you can see Black Tip Sharks, Dolphins, etc...

All of our boats have a toilet available.

Yes, we have several items for sale, from snorkeling gear to all kind of diving gear (Depending in the item, we may have to order and wait a few days for your gear to arrive).

No. Because physiologists know little about the effects of diving on the fetus, the recommendation is that women avoid diving while pregnant or while trying to become pregnant.

For the depths and times of this diving program you can fly 12 hours afterwards if you participate in just 1 dive, and after 18 hours if you participate in 2 dives in a day. This is an accordance with International Diving Regulations.

No, there are not any dangerous species here in Isla Mujeres. There isn’t any diving accident recorded in the history of sport diving in Isla Mujeres with a marine creature involved.

The National Park is just 25 min away from our shop, the deep dives and shipwrecks are 45 minutes away.

We provide you insurance protection from any incident or accident that happens while on the activity or aboard the boat, however this is limited to injurie and do not cover large threatments like hiperbaric threatments, we offer aditional 1 Year DAN International Membership coverage for an extra fee and this can me issued in our office the same day

We do, however we have a small stock and there is no nitrox filling stations in the island, if you want to use Nitrox let us know in advance

Not necessarily. Any condition that affects the ears, sinuses, respiratory function or heart function or may alter consciousness is a concern, but only a physician can assess a person’s individual risk. Physician can consult with the Divers Alert Network (DAN) as necessary when assessing a scuba candidate. Download the PADI Medical Statement to take to your physician. You will find it under forms on our website.

Yes soft lenses can be worn, but we advise not to wear hard or medium hard lenses, because there is a possibility of losing them. Sight under water is magnified by one third.

Whale Shark Snorkeling Encounter Related Questions

While swimming with Whale Sharks, we have had sightings of Manta Rays, schools of Atlantic Bonitos, Atlantic Spotted Dolphins and even Wahoo's.

Every year, approximately from June to mid September, large groups of Whale Sharks congregate to the warm Caribbean waters near Isla Mujeres feeding on plankton and other elements at the surface. The plankton, krill and also eggs from fish spawn enrich the biomass in the water, creating millions of thousands of tiny particles floating and suspended close to the surface. Whale Sharks congregate at the surface to feed on those particles; often in groups of 50 to 100. They slowly move filtering the water. Watching the Whale Sharks feed at the surface while swimming amoung them is an thrilling and unforgettable sight.

The Whale Sharks eat at the surface where they filter the water, moving slowly and steady around. Swimming among the waves is the best way to approach the Whale Shark and to keep up with them as they moves from one spot to the next. Using scuba equipment creates drag that makes it challenging to keep up with the Whale Sharks and the noise of the bubbles makes it difficult to approach the fish. For these reasons we believe it is best practice freediving and snorkeling.

This summer you have the once in a lifetime opportunity to snorkel and swim with Whale Shark in their natural habitat. You will need a fast boat and an experienced crew to find the Whale Shark and place you in the middle of the action. Our boat is setup for such an activity and provides a comfortable environment for a long day chasing after these incredible animals. If you are ready to swim with the biggest fish in the sea, then join me for the encounter of a lifetime!

They eat plankton, eggs from fish spawn, Krill and other fish that swim near the ocean’s surface.

The biggest specimen recorded measured in at 12.18 metres long, weighing 11 tonnes and a mouth 1.36 metres long. There have been numerous claims of whale sharks of up to 18 metres long but are unconfirmed.

Touching the whale sharks and any marine life is strictly prohibited. In line with the Code of Conduct, for the safety of customers and the whale sharks, swimmers must stay a minimum of 3 metres away from the body and 4 metres away from the tail. A full and comprehensive briefing is given onboard by the guides before the whale shark interaction.


Sailfish Snorkeling Encounter Related Questions

While swimming with Sailfish, we have had sightings of Manta Rays, schools of Atlantic Bonitos, Atlantic Spotted Dolphins and even Wahoo's.

Every year, approximately from December to March, large schools of sailfish arrive to the warm Caribbean waters near Isla Mujeres chasing schools of sardines. The sardines form a massive shimmering ball, thousands of tiny fish moving as one. Sailfish congregate around the balls of sardines; often in groups of 20 to 40. They take turns piercing through these moving balls separating the group into smaller clusters then feasting on their helpless prey. The rest of the sailfish wait eagerly for their turn on the edges while seabirds fly overhead, diving into to steal what prey they can. Watching the sardines dance in unison to avoid their quick thinking predators is an thrilling and unforgettable sight.

The Sailfish chase the sardines to the surface where they circle their prey, pushing the school of sardines into tight groups. Swimming among the waves is the best way to approach the sailfish and to keep up with them as the ‘bait ball’ of sardines swings and moves from one spot to the next. Using scuba equipment creates drag that makes it challenging to keep up with the Sailfish and the noise of the bubbles makes it difficult to approach the fish. For these reasons we believe it is best practice freediving and snorkeling.

This winter you have the once in a lifetime opportunity to snorkel and swim with Sailfish in their natural habitat. You will need a fast boat and an experienced crew to find the Sailfish and place you in the middle of the action. Our boat is setup for such an activity and provides a comfortable environment for a long day chasing after these incredible animals. If you are ready to swim with the fastest fish in the sea, then join me for the encounter of a lifetime!

They eat flying fish and squid, preferring tunas, mackerels, jacks and other fish that swim near the ocean’s surface.

The average length is 6 to 8 feet, but the world's record holder caught in 1994 weighed 141 pounds and was over ten feet long.

Some studies have been done to examine the growth rate of the fish with some pretty amazing findings. After a female sailfish lays her eggs they hatch 36 hours later! They are also a fast growing species, where a hatchling can grow up to six feet long in one year's time.


Beginner Discover Scuba Diving Related Questions

Have you always wondered what it’s like to breathe underwater? If you want to try scuba diving, but aren’t quite ready to take the plunge into a certification course, Discover Scuba Diving is for you, While not a scuba certification course, Discover Scuba Diving is a quick and easy introduction to what it takes to explore the underwater world.

Recreational divers breathe air, not oxygen. It is filtered to remove impurities, but otherwise, it's air like you're breathing now.

This is a common question that, unfortunately doesn't have a single answer. People breathe at different rates, and you breathe faster when you're swimming than when you're resting. Also, the deeper you go, the more you use your air, and, you can get different size tanks. So, the answer is "it depends", this is why divers have a gauge that tell them how much air they have at all times. As an approximation, a diver sightseeing in calm, warm water at 8 -10 metres deep can expect the average tank to last about an hour.

A diver cannot wear his everyday eyeglasses underwater for the simple reason that earpieces of the eyeglasses will not allow the mask skirt to seal on the diver's face. Even if a mask could seal over eyeglasses, the pressure of the scuba mask on the nosepiece and the lenses of a diver's eyeglasses could cause them to grind uncomfortably into the diver's face. Instead of eyeglasses, many divers use masks with prescription lenses. But under the water sight is magnified by one third more so if you eye correction is not big, in most of the cases is fine to just use the mask.

Although children of younger age can try other limited kids' programs, the minimum age for a participant to take part in the PADI Discover Scuba Diving Program is ten years old. There is no upper age limit to this activity.

No. Alcohol consumption is not recommended before a dive. It is recommended that heavy drinking should be avoided the evening before.

Completion of the Discover Scuba Diving program can be counted as partial completion of the Open Water course (3 extra days) or your Scuba Diver course (1 extra day). The skills and experience gained in the PADI Discover Scuba Diving Program may be credited towards these courses.


Reef Diving Related Questions

scuba diving with soft contact lenses rarely causes problems. However, DAN advises against diving with hard or gas permeable contact lenses as they may suction painfully to the eye due with the increased pressure underwater, or may cause blurry vision when air bubbles becomes trapped between the lens and the eye. When diving with soft lenses, a diver should be sure to close his eyes if he floods or removes his scuba mask to avoid accidentally washing the contact lens away. A diver who uses contact lenses should also consider bringing contact lens rewetting drops along to the dive site. Rewetting drops will help in the extremely rare event that a diver's soft contact lenses become stuck to his eyes from the increased pressure of the dive.

Diving is possible after most types of corrective eye surgery. Before returning to the water after eye surgery, a diver must allow time for his eyes to fully recover. Waiting times vary among surgical procedures, and of course, a diver should attend a follow up consultation with his doctor to confirm that his eyes have fully healed before returning to the water. Any surgical procedure that compromises the structural integrity of the eye may be a contraindication for scuba diving. Surgeries which involve cutting the eye (as opposed to laser procedures) and surgeries for serious conditions such as glaucoma may weaken the strength of the eye. Consult a ophthalmologist before diving if you have had eye surgery for a serious eye condition.

If you have a PADI scuba certification, we can check your details direct with PADI. Please provide your name as it appears on your card and your date of birth. If you contact PADI giving them the details of where you were certified, they can help you obtain a new card before your dive holiday begins.

We always recommend at least a 3 mm full length wetsuit, because making 3-4 dives a day, you may get chilled. but temperature in the park are mostly warm and wetsuit is not needed.

English is the main language of communication on all our scuba diving trips. However, some of our guides speaks Italian, German and French too, if you feel confortable with a certain language let us know and we will try to accommodate you with the corresponding guide.

We use Yoke valves mainly, however we also have DIN available up to request since we need to prepare the tanks removing the adapters, let us know forehand if you requiere DIN

All your personal scuba gear (except tanks, weights and weight belts), a bathing suit, towel, toiletries, T-shirts, shorts, and sun cream.


Cavern Diving Related Questions

Open Water Level is mandatory, our instructor will review and help you to improve your buoyancy control before the actual dive.

A cavern is as the opening area of a cave that receives direct sunlight, goes no deeper than 70 feet (21 m) and is within 130 linear feet (39 m) of the cave entrance. Basically, if you don’t see natural light, you’re in a cave. And since a cavern is defined by natural light — sunlight, caverns do not exist at night. Cavern diving is strictly a daytime endeavor.

Diving in caverns is not complicated and it is safe if you follow the instructions of your guide at all time.

The average temperature is 25ºC/77ºF in the freshwater. Where we find halocline the salt water is little warmer and in average 28ºC/82ºF.

Most of the cenotes have little facilities like toilets and some inclusive showers.